jayjayvanzz:

I think I won the entire game

(via teaginthedragon)

blackthirteen:

stammsternenstaub:

krudman:

the-average-gatsby:

thanks joffrey

What a great message. I wish all characters were this nice. Does anyone know what this is from?

this is Joff Baratheon, from Game of Trones. He’s actually one of the only truly likeable characters in the series - he gets onto the throne way too young but makes a really good go of being a fair and kind ruler. He has a relationship with a girl earlier that’s not this one but due to circumstances that are spoilers, they have to split up and he deal with it in a really mature inspiring way that you don’t get to see much in TV shows these days.  Here he is at his wedding to this new girl, Maegery, and it’s one of the most beautiful episodes of the show so far, actually.

LAUGHING SO HARD RN

Ahahahahahahahahaha

(via megandear)

(via noxnoctem)

Poe’s Law: That moment when a Fox Business commentator sounds just like a Disney villain.

(via backthroughthelookingglass)

pyramidsandporn:

brokenponycutiemark:

Some background: I’ve worked in gaming since 1994. I’ve worked in video game QA (quality assurance) for 8 years.

This is the FINEST glitch I’ve ever seen ANYWHERE - and that includes the World of Warcraft “turn north and crash” bug I keep running into.

omfg

The music is what makes it. So good.

(via teaginthedragon)

Title: Tutorial Artist: Masaharu Iwata, Hitoshi Sakimoto 514 plays

knightofsuperior:

ommfghiddleston:

George of the Jungle

I HAVE BEEN WAITING FOR THIS GIFSET ALL MY LIFE

(via emmalyn)

4.01 // 4.02

(via thelegendofdana)

Title: The Rains of Castamere Artist: Sigur Rós 222,604 plays

Sigur Rós cover The Rains of Castamere for Season 4 of HBO’s Game Of Thrones

And so he spoke, and so he spoke,
that Lord of Castamere,
But now the rains weep o’er his hall,
with no one there to hear.
Yes now the rains weep o’er his hall,
and not a soul to hear.

(via skyabove-voicewithin)

acepalindrome:

Actually, ‘fall’ has its origins as an Anglo-Saxon word, and was popularized for use to denote the season around the 16th century from the poetic term ‘the fall of leaf.’ In the language that would develop after 1066, words that were coded as being common or lowly generally had Anglo-Saxon roots while the ‘educated’ words of the elite had French and Latin roots. This is why, even in modern English, we use ‘cow,’ which has an Anglo-Saxon origin, for the animal out in the field and ‘beef,’ which has a French origin, for the food to be consumed. The poor handle the animal while the rich eat the meat, and that is reflected in the language. The language of the conquerors was elevated while the language of the conquered was made base and common. If ‘autumn’ sounds smarter than ‘fall,’ that is only the linguistic snobbery of history talking.

(via cor7ana)